Hey travelers!

If you’re planning on booking an educational student tour to sunny Los Angeles, you’ll not be disappointed by the vast amount of educational activities and museums that await you!

I had the pleasure of visiting the exhibition on Pompeii yesterday at the California Science Center, which also happens to house the space shuttle Endeavour. However, that’s for another blog post…

The Pompeii exhibition was incredibly well presented. It features over 150 precious artifacts that are on loan from the Naples National Archaeological Museum in Naples, Italy. It wonderfully showcases what life would’ve been like before that fateful day in August. The exhibit goes into great detail on all aspects of everyday life. From the various architectural styles, cooking, bathing, religion, gladiator fights, and much more, the exhibit allows guests to become familiar with the opulent lifestyle of this Ancient Roman society.

Visitors will see wall-sized frescoes, marble and bronze sculptures, gladiator armor, jewelry, ancient Roman coins, and full body casts of the volcano’s victims. As you move through the exhibit, you’ll get closer to experiencing the disastrous eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Through an immersive theatre experience, you will feel the early morning rumbles that were felt on August 24, 79 A.D., and then the smoke that fully blocked out the day’s light.

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The exhibit culminates with the reveal of several full body casts of the human figure in various twisted forms. Each of the figures was asphyxiated by extreme heat and noxious gases and have forever been frozen in time. You are able to see the look of fright on their faces, and the imprints of their clothes and shoes. It’s quite haunting knowing the terror that the citizens faced.

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As Pompeii vanished beneath the ash, it was also preserved for future generations. It’s through the excavated ruins that were rediscovered just 250 years ago, artifacts, multimedia experiences, and hands-on exhibits that allow students and teachers to learn about archaeology, volcanology, and the engineering techniques of this ancient civilization.

So whether you have the opportunity to visit Pompeii on an educational tour with EA Tours to Italy or just visit this marvelous exhibit in Los Angeles, I encourage you to do so. Pompeii: The Exhibition provides an unique outlook on what daily life was like before that tragic day when everything changed.

Keep traveling,

Kate.